Science Junkie
jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo
The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.
Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?
(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

The environmental impact of oysters, in one photo

The water in both tanks came from the same source. The one on the right has bivalves. Not only do oysters naturally filter the waters in which they live, they can even protect humans from destructive hurricanes. For more, read about New York’s efforts to bring back oyster populations in the once-toxic Hudson River.

Delicious AND helpful. Who knew?

(photo via Steve Vilnit on Twitter)

"If I give a public lecture to a bunch of high school students and I talk about the role that neural oscillations play in coordinating information transfer via spiked timing relative to oscillatory phases, people’s eyes glaze over by the third word. Whereas if I go into a classroom and I start talking about why do zombies crave human flesh, what in their brains might make them do this, then people pay attention."

-

Bradley Voytek, Assistant Professor of Computational Cognitive Science and Neuroscience at UC San Diego and a member of the Zombie Research Society.

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rhamphotheca:

Books: Life Below the Ankles
by David L. Hu
HOW SNAKES WORK: Structure, Function and Behavior of the World’s Snakes. Harvey B. Lillywhite. xiv + 242 pp. Oxford University Press, 2014. $49.95.
Right below our ankles lies a whole—and wholly different—world. Here, with a shift in perspective and scale, grass grows as tall as trees and rocks are as large as boulders. The landscape is so dense that animals can virtually swim in it, wiggling through oceans of grass and debris. Roughly 150 million years ago, a group of four-legged reptiles began to adapt to this rich lower world, evolving increasingly long and slender body plans until they were entirely limbless. From that point, there was no going back. In the switch to life without legs, these creatures also acquired a complete anatomical redesign, inside and out. The result was the animals we know as snakes.
Harvey B. Lillywhite’s How Snakes Work explores the ways these animals thrive in the dark, disordered landscape of the forest floor. That emphasis on how sets the book apart, as Lillywhite, a field biologist specializing in snake physiology, focuses on the fantastic tricks and tactics essential to life at ankle level. The result tickles the imagination. Using photographs, detailed explanations, personal stories, and scholarly references, the author convincingly transports the reader into this lower world, introducing a whole cast of strange creatures and their even stranger behaviors…
(read more: American Scientist)
image: Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis)

rhamphotheca:

Books: Life Below the Ankles

by David L. Hu

HOW SNAKES WORK: Structure, Function and Behavior of the World’s Snakes. Harvey B. Lillywhite. xiv + 242 pp. Oxford University Press, 2014. $49.95.

Right below our ankles lies a whole—and wholly different—world. Here, with a shift in perspective and scale, grass grows as tall as trees and rocks are as large as boulders. The landscape is so dense that animals can virtually swim in it, wiggling through oceans of grass and debris. Roughly 150 million years ago, a group of four-legged reptiles began to adapt to this rich lower world, evolving increasingly long and slender body plans until they were entirely limbless. From that point, there was no going back. In the switch to life without legs, these creatures also acquired a complete anatomical redesign, inside and out. The result was the animals we know as snakes.

Harvey B. Lillywhite’s How Snakes Work explores the ways these animals thrive in the dark, disordered landscape of the forest floor. That emphasis on how sets the book apart, as Lillywhite, a field biologist specializing in snake physiology, focuses on the fantastic tricks and tactics essential to life at ankle level. The result tickles the imagination. Using photographs, detailed explanations, personal stories, and scholarly references, the author convincingly transports the reader into this lower world, introducing a whole cast of strange creatures and their even stranger behaviors…

(read more: American Scientist)

image: Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis)

rjzimmerman:

From the World Wildlife Fund report entitled, “Living Planet Report,” on loss of species. (By the way, the graphs use the acronym, “LPI,” which is translated as the “Living Plant Index,” which measures more than 10,000 representative populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Those populations have declined by 52 per cent since 1970. 
The World Wildlife Fund says: “Put another way, in less than two human generations, population sizes of vertebrate species have dropped by half. These are the living forms that constitute the fabric of the ecosystems which sustain life on Earth – and the barometer of what we are doing to our own planet, our only home. We ignore their decline at our peril.”
The report can be read here.
Zoom Info
rjzimmerman:

From the World Wildlife Fund report entitled, “Living Planet Report,” on loss of species. (By the way, the graphs use the acronym, “LPI,” which is translated as the “Living Plant Index,” which measures more than 10,000 representative populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Those populations have declined by 52 per cent since 1970. 
The World Wildlife Fund says: “Put another way, in less than two human generations, population sizes of vertebrate species have dropped by half. These are the living forms that constitute the fabric of the ecosystems which sustain life on Earth – and the barometer of what we are doing to our own planet, our only home. We ignore their decline at our peril.”
The report can be read here.
Zoom Info

rjzimmerman:

From the World Wildlife Fund report entitled, “Living Planet Report,” on loss of species. (By the way, the graphs use the acronym, “LPI,” which is translated as the “Living Plant Index,” which measures more than 10,000 representative populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. Those populations have declined by 52 per cent since 1970. 

The World Wildlife Fund says: “Put another way, in less than two human generations, population sizes of vertebrate species have dropped by half. These are the living forms that constitute the fabric of the ecosystems which sustain life on Earth – and the barometer of what we are doing to our own planet, our only home. We ignore their decline at our peril.”

The report can be read here.

The Strange and Radical New World of 3-D Printed Body Parts

A few years ago, if a horrific infection ate your jawbone, doctors had to build makeshift mandibles from your fibula, a process that left you sliced open as surgeons painstakingly whittled away at replacement bone. Yech.
Today they can just hit Control-P: Based on MRI and CT scans of your busted-up body parts, hyperspecialized 3-D printers produce custom replacements, no sculpture skills required. 
Read more (via WIRED)

The Strange and Radical New World of 3-D Printed Body Parts

A few years ago, if a horrific infection ate your jawbone, doctors had to build makeshift mandibles from your fibula, a process that left you sliced open as surgeons painstakingly whittled away at replacement bone. Yech.

Today they can just hit Control-P: Based on MRI and CT scans of your busted-up body parts, hyperspecialized 3-D printers produce custom replacements, no sculpture skills required. 

Read more (via WIRED)