Science Junkie
candidscience:

Weblike sheath covering developing egg chambers in a giant grasshopper
Kevin Edwards, Johny Shajahan and Doug Whitman, Illinois State University
The lubber grasshopper, found throughout the southern United States, is frequently used in biology classes to teach students about the respiratory system of insects. Unlike mammals, which have red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, insects have breathing tubes that carry air through their exoskeleton directly to where it’s needed. This image shows the breathing tubes embedded in the weblike sheath cells that cover developing egg chambers.
Found on National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Extraordinary! And also the other images are great to appreciate the intricate details of life.

candidscience:

Weblike sheath covering developing egg chambers in a giant grasshopper

Kevin Edwards, Johny Shajahan and Doug Whitman, Illinois State University

The lubber grasshopper, found throughout the southern United States, is frequently used in biology classes to teach students about the respiratory system of insects. Unlike mammals, which have red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, insects have breathing tubes that carry air through their exoskeleton directly to where it’s needed. This image shows the breathing tubes embedded in the weblike sheath cells that cover developing egg chambers.

Found on National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Extraordinary! And also the other images are great to appreciate the intricate details of life.

ucresearch:

Learn to code while playing Minecraft
Did you know that you can learn programming while playing a video game? A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed LearnToMod, software that teaches kids introductory programming with Minecraft. Students will learn JavaScript, the essential programming language of the web, and can also earn University of California college credits, regardless of their age.

“Our goal is to teach kids computer science while they’re having fun.”

Read more about how UC San Diego computer scientists are teaching programming with Minecraft.
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

Learn to code while playing Minecraft
Did you know that you can learn programming while playing a video game? A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed LearnToMod, software that teaches kids introductory programming with Minecraft. Students will learn JavaScript, the essential programming language of the web, and can also earn University of California college credits, regardless of their age.

“Our goal is to teach kids computer science while they’re having fun.”

Read more about how UC San Diego computer scientists are teaching programming with Minecraft.
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

Learn to code while playing Minecraft
Did you know that you can learn programming while playing a video game? A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed LearnToMod, software that teaches kids introductory programming with Minecraft. Students will learn JavaScript, the essential programming language of the web, and can also earn University of California college credits, regardless of their age.

“Our goal is to teach kids computer science while they’re having fun.”

Read more about how UC San Diego computer scientists are teaching programming with Minecraft.
Zoom Info

ucresearch:

Learn to code while playing Minecraft


Did you know that you can learn programming while playing a video game? A team of computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, has developed LearnToMod, software that teaches kids introductory programming with Minecraft. Students will learn JavaScript, the essential programming language of the web, and can also earn University of California college credits, regardless of their age.

“Our goal is to teach kids computer science while they’re having fun.”

Read more about how UC San Diego computer scientists are teaching programming with Minecraft.

asapscience:

THE SCIENCE OF DEPRESSION

What exactly is going on inside of a depressed person? We look at the scientific basis for depression, and shed light on the fact that it is a disease with biological, psychological, and social implications.

We can see it in our biology, in our genes and in our actions. For those who are depressed, it’s not simply something they can ‘get over’ and ‘be more positive about’. If you know somebody who is suffering, please be compassionate and know that depression is a serious illness and requires genuine recovery/help. 

txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info
txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible
Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  
Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.
Read More
Zoom Info

txchnologist:

Electric Fields Made Visible

Physics educator James Lincoln helps people understand the natural world. The gifs above are from a Youtube video he made on how to “see” an electric field, the region around a charged object where electric force is experienced. When the object is positively charged, electric field lines extend radially outward from the object. When the object is negatively charged, the lines extend radially inward.  

Click the gifs for more info or see the full video below.

Read More

Answers Time

It everything in our universe is going to die at one point, stars, planets, etc then doesn’t that mean at one point nothing will exist and nothing will beable to exist again
image

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itssedimentary:

END-ORDOVICIAN (440 Ma)
Severity: 2nd worst
Cause: Some type of C cycle disturbance, not well constrained
Climate: Abrupt ice age followed by rapid warming
Aftermath: Cambrian organisms (e.g. trilobites) decimated
During the End-Ordovician mass extinction, 25% of known marine families and 60% of marine genera were wiped out. Warm-water invertebrates were the hardest hit, as the event was likely caused by a severe cooling event in the world’s oceans triggered by Gondwanan glaciation.However, as with just about all of the mass extinctions, other causes have been offered, such as a gamma ray burst and volcanism and weathering. 
Click HERE to see all Mass Extinction Monday posts

itssedimentary:

END-ORDOVICIAN (440 Ma)

Severity: 2nd worst

Cause: Some type of C cycle disturbance, not well constrained

Climate: Abrupt ice age followed by rapid warming

Aftermath: Cambrian organisms (e.g. trilobites) decimated

During the End-Ordovician mass extinction, 25% of known marine families and 60% of marine genera were wiped out. Warm-water invertebrates were the hardest hit, as the event was likely caused by a severe cooling event in the world’s oceans triggered by Gondwanan glaciation.However, as with just about all of the mass extinctions, other causes have been offered, such as a gamma ray burst and volcanism and weathering

Click HERE to see all Mass Extinction Monday posts

Cats’ pupils
It’s always challenging to establish with precision the reason for an evolutionary adaptation. I can answer this question with a well-supported theory, but the exceptions are not lacking.
Generally, the eyes of nocturnal animals —like small cats— have multifocal lenses that allows them to increase contrast and depth of field in low light conditions. A circular pupil, contracting to protect the eye against bright light, would interfere with this type of structure (the iris shades the peripheral zones of the lens) leading to the loss of well-focused images. The slit pupils, therefore, may have developed in association with multifocal optical systems because more effective. 
Vice versa, big cats are generally diurnal predators and they have monofocal eyes like us. So, their pupils tend to be circular because they are an adequate adaptation to monofocal optical systems.
Asked by lorin-irenaImages credit: Felipe Santana - fPat Murray
Zoom Info
Cats’ pupils
It’s always challenging to establish with precision the reason for an evolutionary adaptation. I can answer this question with a well-supported theory, but the exceptions are not lacking.
Generally, the eyes of nocturnal animals —like small cats— have multifocal lenses that allows them to increase contrast and depth of field in low light conditions. A circular pupil, contracting to protect the eye against bright light, would interfere with this type of structure (the iris shades the peripheral zones of the lens) leading to the loss of well-focused images. The slit pupils, therefore, may have developed in association with multifocal optical systems because more effective. 
Vice versa, big cats are generally diurnal predators and they have monofocal eyes like us. So, their pupils tend to be circular because they are an adequate adaptation to monofocal optical systems.
Asked by lorin-irenaImages credit: Felipe Santana - fPat Murray
Zoom Info
Cats’ pupils
It’s always challenging to establish with precision the reason for an evolutionary adaptation. I can answer this question with a well-supported theory, but the exceptions are not lacking.
Generally, the eyes of nocturnal animals —like small cats— have multifocal lenses that allows them to increase contrast and depth of field in low light conditions. A circular pupil, contracting to protect the eye against bright light, would interfere with this type of structure (the iris shades the peripheral zones of the lens) leading to the loss of well-focused images. The slit pupils, therefore, may have developed in association with multifocal optical systems because more effective. 
Vice versa, big cats are generally diurnal predators and they have monofocal eyes like us. So, their pupils tend to be circular because they are an adequate adaptation to monofocal optical systems.
Asked by lorin-irenaImages credit: Felipe Santana - fPat Murray
Zoom Info

Cats’ pupils

It’s always challenging to establish with precision the reason for an evolutionary adaptation. I can answer this question with a well-supported theory, but the exceptions are not lacking.

Generally, the eyes of nocturnal animals —like small cats— have multifocal lenses that allows them to increase contrast and depth of field in low light conditions. A circular pupil, contracting to protect the eye against bright light, would interfere with this type of structure (the iris shades the peripheral zones of the lens) leading to the loss of well-focused images. The slit pupils, therefore, may have developed in association with multifocal optical systems because more effective. 

Vice versa, big cats are generally diurnal predators and they have monofocal eyes like us. So, their pupils tend to be circular because they are an adequate adaptation to monofocal optical systems.

Asked by lorin-irena
Images credit: Felipe Santana - fPat Murray

afro-dominicano:

NGC 2070 (30 Doradus, The Tarantula Nebula) in Dorado

In HaLRGB and Ha filters, and an annotated version.
The Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).
The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc (160 000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies.
It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc. The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum.
At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approximate diameter 35 light years) that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450 000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.
© Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov
Zoom Info
afro-dominicano:

NGC 2070 (30 Doradus, The Tarantula Nebula) in Dorado

In HaLRGB and Ha filters, and an annotated version.
The Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).
The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc (160 000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies.
It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc. The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum.
At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approximate diameter 35 light years) that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450 000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.
© Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov
Zoom Info
afro-dominicano:

NGC 2070 (30 Doradus, The Tarantula Nebula) in Dorado

In HaLRGB and Ha filters, and an annotated version.
The Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).
The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc (160 000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies.
It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc. The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum.
At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approximate diameter 35 light years) that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450 000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.
© Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov
Zoom Info

afro-dominicano:

NGC 2070 (30 Doradus, The Tarantula Nebula) in Dorado

In HaLRGB and Ha filters, and an annotated version.

The Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC).

The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc (160 000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies.

It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc. The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum.

At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approximate diameter 35 light years) that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450 000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.

© Velimir Popov, Emil Ivanov