Science Junkie
Study solves plant sex mystery
A team of biologists from the University of Leicester has solved a mystery surrounding how plants have sex. The researchers have discovered a pair of proteins made by flowering plants that are vital for the production of the sperm present within each pollen grain.
Scientists already knew that flowering plants, in contrast to animals, require not one, but two sperm cells for successful fertilisation: one to join with the egg cell to produce the embryo and one to join with a second cell to produce the nutrient-rich endosperm inside the seed.
The mystery of this ‘double fertilization’ process is how each single pollen grain is able to produce twin sperm cells.
This breakthrough study from the Twell Laboratory at the University of Leicester, published in the prestigious academic journal The Plant Cell, has found a pair of genes called DAZ1 and DAZ2 that are essential for making twin sperm cells. Plants with mutated versions of DAZ1 and DAZ2 produce pollen grains with a single sperm that is unable to fertilize.
The researchers show that DAZ1 and DAZ2 are controlled by the protein DUO1 that acts as a ‘master switch’ - so that DUO1 and the DAZ1/DAZ2 genes work in tandem to control a gene network that ensures a pair of fertile sperm is made inside each pollen grain.
Read more
Image credit: Jerome Twell

Study solves plant sex mystery

A team of biologists from the University of Leicester has solved a mystery surrounding how plants have sex. The researchers have discovered a pair of proteins made by flowering plants that are vital for the production of the sperm present within each pollen grain.

Scientists already knew that flowering plants, in contrast to animals, require not one, but two sperm cells for successful fertilisation: one to join with the egg cell to produce the embryo and one to join with a second cell to produce the nutrient-rich endosperm inside the seed.

The mystery of this ‘double fertilization’ process is how each single pollen grain is able to produce twin sperm cells.

This breakthrough study from the Twell Laboratory at the University of Leicester, published in the prestigious academic journal The Plant Cell, has found a pair of genes called DAZ1 and DAZ2 that are essential for making twin sperm cells. Plants with mutated versions of DAZ1 and DAZ2 produce pollen grains with a single sperm that is unable to fertilize.

The researchers show that DAZ1 and DAZ2 are controlled by the protein DUO1 that acts as a ‘master switch’ - so that DUO1 and the DAZ1/DAZ2 genes work in tandem to control a gene network that ensures a pair of fertile sperm is made inside each pollen grain.

Read more

Image credit: Jerome Twell







  1. scienceblog38 reblogged this from science-junkie and added:
    science archive
  2. science328 reblogged this from science-junkie and added:
    science archive
  3. terrajayde reblogged this from science-junkie
  4. thatgirlinthebowtie reblogged this from science-junkie
  5. missunderstoodconqueror reblogged this from ellestanger
  6. whoknewwhattodo reblogged this from science-junkie
  7. lynnnwynnn reblogged this from ellestanger
  8. juanadrianw reblogged this from science-junkie
  9. fake-science reblogged this from science-junkie
  10. sinisterkid505 reblogged this from science-junkie
  11. happinessmakestheworldgoround reblogged this from thebiobabe
  12. hermioneeowynp reblogged this from science-junkie
  13. lesliegale reblogged this from science-junkie
  14. hananokimitachi reblogged this from science-junkie
  15. rjband10 reblogged this from science-junkie
  16. tazbird69 reblogged this from science-junkie
  17. faraldebary reblogged this from science-junkie
  18. mojo-the-hobbit reblogged this from science-junkie
  19. hedgehogozzy reblogged this from ellestanger
  20. bartzvillon reblogged this from science-junkie