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Image 1. Ten-color super-resolution images (artificially arranged into one composite) of synthetic DNA nanostructures displaying patterns that resemble the numerals “0” through “9”. Credit: Johannes B. Woehrstein/Wyss Institute”.
Image 2. Microtubules (green), mitochondria (purple), Golgi apparatus (red), and peroxisomes (yellow) from a single human cell. Credit: Maier Avendano/Wyss Institute.
Capturing ultrasharp images of multiple cell components at once
A new microscopy method could enable scientists to generate snapshots of dozens of different biomolecules at once in a single human cell, a team from the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported Sunday in Nature Methods.
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Image 1. Ten-color super-resolution images (artificially arranged into one composite) of synthetic DNA nanostructures displaying patterns that resemble the numerals “0” through “9”. Credit: Johannes B. Woehrstein/Wyss Institute”.
Image 2. Microtubules (green), mitochondria (purple), Golgi apparatus (red), and peroxisomes (yellow) from a single human cell. Credit: Maier Avendano/Wyss Institute.
Capturing ultrasharp images of multiple cell components at once
A new microscopy method could enable scientists to generate snapshots of dozens of different biomolecules at once in a single human cell, a team from the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported Sunday in Nature Methods.
Read more
Zoom Info

Image 1. Ten-color super-resolution images (artificially arranged into one composite) of synthetic DNA nanostructures displaying patterns that resemble the numerals “0” through “9”. Credit: Johannes B. Woehrstein/Wyss Institute”.

Image 2. Microtubules (green), mitochondria (purple), Golgi apparatus (red), and peroxisomes (yellow) from a single human cell. Credit: Maier Avendano/Wyss Institute.

Capturing ultrasharp images of multiple cell components at once

A new microscopy method could enable scientists to generate snapshots of dozens of different biomolecules at once in a single human cell, a team from the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported Sunday in Nature Methods.

Read more







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