Science Junkie
Bookshelf: Part TwoPhysics
Alas, I can not meet the first request. I can only say that, first of all, when it comes to engineering, mathematical analysis is the answer. Next, you can move to mathematical analysis, and then, you should understand fully mathematical analysis. At the same time, you need to study: chemistry and physics, of course, but also linear algebra, analytic geometry, analytical mechanics (for mechanical engineering) and physical chemistry. I stopped at the first step of mathematical analysis, then I switched to natural sciences, dearest to me. The textbooks that I have in my hands are all by Italian authors (E. Giusti, U. Tiberio, S. Abeasis …) and, in any case, I think it would not be the kind of list that happychemtrails wanted. 
I’m also not really knowledgeable in the second request’s subjects: I like physics —though often it makes my mind bleed— but, to better understand the subject, I have not sought out books to learn more about a certain topic, but to give a context to what I had learned in school and a face to the characters of the textbook. The books that I have read, therefore, are more a sort of history of physics than anything else, and unfortunately, also in this case, almost all the authors are Italian (e.g. Enrico Bellone). 
In English, I can recommend these books —some are renowned:

A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking.
Cosmos by Carl Sagan.
In Search of Schrödinger’s Cat by John Gribbin.
Five Equations That Changed the World by Michael Guillen.
Fizz: Nothing is as it Seems by Zvi Schreiber .
For the English speakers interested in science, I want to take Richard Feynman for granted but, in addition, if it can be of help, these are the first titles in my TBR pile:
How to Teach Physics to Your Dog by Chad Orzel.The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene.The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean Carroll.Thirty Years that Shook Physics by George Gamow.
Asked by happychemtrails  -  iamtheswaqmaster.Part One: Biology & Genetics.Images: [x][x][x][x]

Bookshelf: Part Two
Physics

Alas, I can not meet the first request. I can only say that, first of all, when it comes to engineering, mathematical analysis is the answer. Next, you can move to mathematical analysis, and then, you should understand fully mathematical analysis. At the same time, you need to study: chemistry and physics, of course, but also linear algebra, analytic geometry, analytical mechanics (for mechanical engineering) and physical chemistry. I stopped at the first step of mathematical analysis, then I switched to natural sciences, dearest to me. The textbooks that I have in my hands are all by Italian authors (E. Giusti, U. Tiberio, S. Abeasis …) and, in any case, I think it would not be the kind of list that happychemtrails wanted. 

I’m also not really knowledgeable in the second request’s subjects: I like physics —though often it makes my mind bleed— but, to better understand the subject, I have not sought out books to learn more about a certain topic, but to give a context to what I had learned in school and a face to the characters of the textbook. The books that I have read, therefore, are more a sort of history of physics than anything else, and unfortunately, also in this case, almost all the authors are Italian (e.g. Enrico Bellone). 

In English, I can recommend these books —some are renowned:

image

For the English speakers interested in science, I want to take Richard Feynman for granted but, in addition, if it can be of help, these are the first titles in my TBR pile:

How to Teach Physics to Your Dog by Chad Orzel.
The Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene.
The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean Carroll.
Thirty Years that Shook Physics by George Gamow.


Asked by happychemtrails  -  iamtheswaqmaster.
Part One: Biology & Genetics.
Images: [x][x][x][x]







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