Science Junkie
Nanotechnology solutions to combat superbugs
At at a meeting of infectious disease experts in early 2012, the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Margaret Chan, has warned vividly that the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria may pose grave risks for society: “A post-antibiotic era means, in effect, an end to modern medicine as we know it. Things as common as strep throat or a child’s scratched knee could once again kill.” Chan pointed out that there is a global crisis in antibiotics caused by rapidly evolving resistance among microbes responsible for common infections that threaten to turn them into untreatable diseases. Every antibiotic ever developed was at risk of becoming useless…
The first bug that became resistant to penicillin was Staphylococcus aureus3. This bacterium is often a harmless passenger in the human body, but it can cause illness such as pneumonia or toxic shock syndrome, when it overgrows or produces a toxin. In 1967, another type of penicillin-resistant pneumonia, caused by Streptococcus pneumonia and called pneumococcus, surfaced in a remote village in Papua, New Guinea. In 1983, a hospital acquired intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Enterococcus faecium joined the list of bugs that outwit penicillin. In the past half century, from penicillin to methicillin to vancomycin to daptomycin, a large number of multiple classes of antibiotics have been discovered that inhibit cell-wall synthesis.
Over the years, however, more and more microorganisms, exposed to more and more antibiotics, have adapted to these compounds. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs has now become a worldwide problem. As the use of antibiotics increases for medical, veterinary and agricultural purposes, the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria is an unwelcome consequence. The incidence of the multidrug resistance (MDR) of bacteria which cause infections in hospitals/intensive care units is increasing, and finding microorganisms insensitive to more than 10 different antibiotics is not unusual5. The most striking example is Tuberculosis (TB), which is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. The bacteria causing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) are resistant to the most potent anti-TB drugs like isoniazid and rifampicin…
The emergence of superbugs has made it imperative to search for novel methods, which can combat the microbial resistance. Thus, application of nanotechnology in pharmaceuticals and microbiology is gaining importance to prevent the catastrophic consequences of antibiotic resistance. Nanotechnology based approaches are advantageous to improve various preventive measures such as coatings and filtration. Similarly, diagnosis using efficient nanosensors or probes can speed up the treatment process at an early stage of disease. Nano-based drug carriers for existing antibiotics enhance their bioavailability and make them more targets specific. Also the combination of nanoparticles (NPs) along with antibiotics makes them more lethal for micro-organisms…
General treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria requires multiple drugs regimen,which can cause many side-effects. Also, the treatment is costly and time consuming. Nanoscience can pave way for new treatment methods at much accelerated rate as compared to developing new antibiotics, which probably takes 10-12 yrs at an estimated cost of approximately $4 billion…
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Nanotechnology solutions to combat superbugs
At at a meeting of infectious disease experts in early 2012, the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Margaret Chan, has warned vividly that the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria may pose grave risks for society: “A post-antibiotic era means, in effect, an end to modern medicine as we know it. Things as common as strep throat or a child’s scratched knee could once again kill.” Chan pointed out that there is a global crisis in antibiotics caused by rapidly evolving resistance among microbes responsible for common infections that threaten to turn them into untreatable diseases. Every antibiotic ever developed was at risk of becoming useless…
The first bug that became resistant to penicillin was Staphylococcus aureus3. This bacterium is often a harmless passenger in the human body, but it can cause illness such as pneumonia or toxic shock syndrome, when it overgrows or produces a toxin. In 1967, another type of penicillin-resistant pneumonia, caused by Streptococcus pneumonia and called pneumococcus, surfaced in a remote village in Papua, New Guinea. In 1983, a hospital acquired intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Enterococcus faecium joined the list of bugs that outwit penicillin. In the past half century, from penicillin to methicillin to vancomycin to daptomycin, a large number of multiple classes of antibiotics have been discovered that inhibit cell-wall synthesis.
Over the years, however, more and more microorganisms, exposed to more and more antibiotics, have adapted to these compounds. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs has now become a worldwide problem. As the use of antibiotics increases for medical, veterinary and agricultural purposes, the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria is an unwelcome consequence. The incidence of the multidrug resistance (MDR) of bacteria which cause infections in hospitals/intensive care units is increasing, and finding microorganisms insensitive to more than 10 different antibiotics is not unusual5. The most striking example is Tuberculosis (TB), which is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. The bacteria causing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) are resistant to the most potent anti-TB drugs like isoniazid and rifampicin…
The emergence of superbugs has made it imperative to search for novel methods, which can combat the microbial resistance. Thus, application of nanotechnology in pharmaceuticals and microbiology is gaining importance to prevent the catastrophic consequences of antibiotic resistance. Nanotechnology based approaches are advantageous to improve various preventive measures such as coatings and filtration. Similarly, diagnosis using efficient nanosensors or probes can speed up the treatment process at an early stage of disease. Nano-based drug carriers for existing antibiotics enhance their bioavailability and make them more targets specific. Also the combination of nanoparticles (NPs) along with antibiotics makes them more lethal for micro-organisms…
General treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria requires multiple drugs regimen,which can cause many side-effects. Also, the treatment is costly and time consuming. Nanoscience can pave way for new treatment methods at much accelerated rate as compared to developing new antibiotics, which probably takes 10-12 yrs at an estimated cost of approximately $4 billion…
Read the full article
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Nanotechnology solutions to combat superbugs

At at a meeting of infectious disease experts in early 2012, the Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Dr Margaret Chan, has warned vividly that the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria may pose grave risks for society: “A post-antibiotic era means, in effect, an end to modern medicine as we know it. Things as common as strep throat or a child’s scratched knee could once again kill.” Chan pointed out that there is a global crisis in antibiotics caused by rapidly evolving resistance among microbes responsible for common infections that threaten to turn them into untreatable diseases. Every antibiotic ever developed was at risk of becoming useless…

The first bug that became resistant to penicillin was Staphylococcus aureus3. This bacterium is often a harmless passenger in the human body, but it can cause illness such as pneumonia or toxic shock syndrome, when it overgrows or produces a toxin. In 1967, another type of penicillin-resistant pneumonia, caused by Streptococcus pneumonia and called pneumococcus, surfaced in a remote village in Papua, New Guinea. In 1983, a hospital acquired intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Enterococcus faecium joined the list of bugs that outwit penicillin. In the past half century, from penicillin to methicillin to vancomycin to daptomycin, a large number of multiple classes of antibiotics have been discovered that inhibit cell-wall synthesis.

Over the years, however, more and more microorganisms, exposed to more and more antibiotics, have adapted to these compounds. Resistance to antimicrobial drugs has now become a worldwide problem. As the use of antibiotics increases for medical, veterinary and agricultural purposes, the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria is an unwelcome consequence. The incidence of the multidrug resistance (MDR) of bacteria which cause infections in hospitals/intensive care units is increasing, and finding microorganisms insensitive to more than 10 different antibiotics is not unusual5. The most striking example is Tuberculosis (TB), which is one of the most deadly diseases in the world. The bacteria causing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) are resistant to the most potent anti-TB drugs like isoniazid and rifampicin…

The emergence of superbugs has made it imperative to search for novel methods, which can combat the microbial resistance. Thus, application of nanotechnology in pharmaceuticals and microbiology is gaining importance to prevent the catastrophic consequences of antibiotic resistance. Nanotechnology based approaches are advantageous to improve various preventive measures such as coatings and filtration. Similarly, diagnosis using efficient nanosensors or probes can speed up the treatment process at an early stage of disease. Nano-based drug carriers for existing antibiotics enhance their bioavailability and make them more targets specific. Also the combination of nanoparticles (NPs) along with antibiotics makes them more lethal for micro-organisms…

General treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria requires multiple drugs regimen,which can cause many side-effects. Also, the treatment is costly and time consuming. Nanoscience can pave way for new treatment methods at much accelerated rate as compared to developing new antibiotics, which probably takes 10-12 yrs at an estimated cost of approximately $4 billion…

Read the full article







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