Science Junkie
X-Ray Video Reveals How Bats Power Flight
Novel X-ray video of fruit bats mid-flight reveals a remarkably detailed look at the muscular and skeletal structure required for the mammals to take flight.
Using XROMM (X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology) technology, a team of scientists led by Brown University’s Nicolai Konow was able to better understand how bats manage to be the only mammal capable of sustained flight by capturing three-dimensional images of bone structure and movement patterns.
A big player in the bats’ ability to get airborne, the researchers learned, is the mammals’ capacity to store and recycle energy in the extra-stretchy material of their bicep and triceps tendons.
Read more
Video: [x]Image: by Stefano Milan.
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X-Ray Video Reveals How Bats Power Flight
Novel X-ray video of fruit bats mid-flight reveals a remarkably detailed look at the muscular and skeletal structure required for the mammals to take flight.
Using XROMM (X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology) technology, a team of scientists led by Brown University’s Nicolai Konow was able to better understand how bats manage to be the only mammal capable of sustained flight by capturing three-dimensional images of bone structure and movement patterns.
A big player in the bats’ ability to get airborne, the researchers learned, is the mammals’ capacity to store and recycle energy in the extra-stretchy material of their bicep and triceps tendons.
Read more
Video: [x]Image: by Stefano Milan.
Zoom Info

X-Ray Video Reveals How Bats Power Flight

Novel X-ray video of fruit bats mid-flight reveals a remarkably detailed look at the muscular and skeletal structure required for the mammals to take flight.

Using XROMM (X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology) technology, a team of scientists led by Brown University’s Nicolai Konow was able to better understand how bats manage to be the only mammal capable of sustained flight by capturing three-dimensional images of bone structure and movement patterns.

A big player in the bats’ ability to get airborne, the researchers learned, is the mammals’ capacity to store and recycle energy in the extra-stretchy material of their bicep and triceps tendons.


Read more

Video: [x]
Image: by Stefano Milan.







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