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Mosquitoes? MOSQUITOES?! DID SOMEONE SAY THE WORD MOSQUITOES?!?!The philosophy behind the use of insect repellents is that they have to make you less attractive, almost indigestible, for the little creatures.The active ingredients to which the ask refers are permethrin, imidacloprid  and pyriproxyfen, namely, molecules that belong to the family of synthetic pesticides, therefore, toxic to all living beings. The fact that you can use them on your dog (or on yourself) without doing damage, depends on the concentration of the active ingredient, the dosage used, and the body’s ability to metabolize and excrete them.For example, the infamous DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)  — so much useful and used in the past and now banned — seemed to be a good compromise between toxicity and efficacy: thanks to its use swampy and infested areas all over the world have been drained, but too late it turned out that it have devastating side effects for animals and for humans.If you want to use a good repellent (not free of side effects, though) you should stick to products containing DEET (N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide) or, better, you should use essential oils of Geranium, Citronella or Eucalyptus.Or arm yourself with fly-swatter and crossbow …


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Doc Kon-igi answers

Mosquitoes? MOSQUITOES?! DID SOMEONE SAY THE WORD MOSQUITOES?!?!

The philosophy behind the use of insect repellents is that they have to make you less attractive, almost indigestible, for the little creatures.
The active ingredients to which the ask refers are permethrin, imidacloprid  and pyriproxyfen, namely, molecules that belong to the family of synthetic pesticides, therefore, toxic to all living beings.
The fact that you can use them on your dog (or on yourself) without doing damage, depends on the concentration of the active ingredient, the dosage used, and the body’s ability to metabolize and excrete them.

For example, the infamous DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)  — so much useful and used in the past and now banned — seemed to be a good compromise between toxicity and efficacy: thanks to its use swampy and infested areas all over the world have been drained, but too late it turned out that it have devastating side effects for animals and for humans.

If you want to use a good repellent (not free of side effects, though) you should stick to products containing DEET (N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide) or, better, you should use essential oils of Geranium, Citronella or Eucalyptus.

Or arm yourself with fly-swatter and crossbow

Ask kon-igi & science-junkie a question.







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