Science Junkie
Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young
Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers [of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute] have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It’s not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart’s most frustrating ailments… As heart muscles get older, they grow thicker. The thickened heart can still pump blood out normally, but it can’t relax enough to refill between pumps. The condition is called diastolic heart failure, named after the heart’s resting, or diastolic, phase. There is currently no treatment to reverse the thickening of the heart and restore normal function.But researchers continue to look for such a cardiac fountain of youth. One approach has been to apply a 150-year-old technique to infuse young blood into old mice. Called heterochronic parabiosis the method involves surgically linking the circulatory systems of two mice of different ages by opening a flap of skin on each mouse’s side and stitching the two together so that the same blood pumps through both creatures…This study is a modern validation of 18th-century parabiosis science using 21st century molecular biology, says cardiologist Gerald Dorn of Washington University in St. Louis. However, use of the technique lends the research a gothic, macabre flavor, he says. “I was looking to see whether Tim Burton or Vincent Price were a part of the experimental design.”
Source: sciencemag.org

Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers [of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute] have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It’s not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart’s most frustrating ailments…

 As heart muscles get older, they grow thicker. The thickened heart can still pump blood out normally, but it can’t relax enough to refill between pumps. The condition is called diastolic heart failure, named after the heart’s resting, or diastolic, phase. There is currently no treatment to reverse the thickening of the heart and restore normal function.

But researchers continue to look for such a cardiac fountain of youth. One approach has been to apply a 150-year-old technique to infuse young blood into old mice. Called heterochronic parabiosis the method involves surgically linking the circulatory systems of two mice of different ages by opening a flap of skin on each mouse’s side and stitching the two together so that the same blood pumps through both creatures…

This study is a modern validation of 18th-century parabiosis science using 21st century molecular biology, says cardiologist Gerald Dorn of Washington University in St. Louis. However, use of the technique lends the research a gothic, macabre flavor, he says. “I was looking to see whether Tim Burton or Vincent Price were a part of the experimental design.”


Source: sciencemag.org







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    This…. Is amazing…..
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    So you’re saying mice are vampires that don’t know their power..
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