Science Junkie
Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare MinimumBeneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”
Read moreImages: [x]
Zoom Info
Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare MinimumBeneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”
Read moreImages: [x]
Zoom Info
Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare MinimumBeneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”
Read moreImages: [x]
Zoom Info
Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare MinimumBeneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”
Read moreImages: [x]
Zoom Info
Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare MinimumBeneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”
Read moreImages: [x]
Zoom Info

Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare Minimum

Beneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and sunlight. Yet microbes have thrived in this environment for millions of years. Scientists have puzzled over how these microbes survive, but today there are more answers.

A study led by Karen Lloyd, an assistant professor of microbiology, reveals that these microscopic life-forms called archaea slowly eat tiny bits of protein. The study was released today in Nature.

The finding has implications for understanding the bare minimum conditions needed to support life.

“Subseafloor microbes are some of the most common organisms on earth,” said Lloyd. “There are more of them than there are stars or sand grains. If you go to a mud flat and stick your toes into the squishy mud, you’re touching these archaea. Even though they’ve literally been right under our noses for all of human history, we’ve never known what they’re doing down there.”


Read more
Images: [x]







  1. bobchik reblogged this from bobchiketh
  2. bobcraft reblogged this from bobchiketh
  3. spalumbi reblogged this from science-junkie
  4. mminicola reblogged this from science-junkie
  5. bklynmed reblogged this from scinerds and added:
    Professor Discovers How Microbes Survive at Bare Minimum Beneath the ocean floor is a desolate place with no oxygen and...
  6. --junkdrawer-- reblogged this from scinerds
  7. lachoot reblogged this from thinkaboutelephants
  8. thinkaboutelephants reblogged this from somuchscience
  9. tausendsunny reblogged this from biognosis
  10. amazingclouds reblogged this from biognosis
  11. biognosis reblogged this from scinerds
  12. fornices reblogged this from scinerds
  13. cat-wanderlust reblogged this from wolffeeder
  14. ddirtteethh reblogged this from somuchscience
  15. b0rn-a-li0n reblogged this from sexymachine
  16. sexymachine reblogged this from brightestofcentaurus and added:
    YEAH
  17. brightestofcentaurus reblogged this from earthandscience
  18. bflteens reblogged this from somuchscience
  19. wolffeeder reblogged this from scinerds
  20. linecolourpattern reblogged this from earthandscience
  21. blissy-leaves reblogged this from earthandscience
  22. earthandscience reblogged this from somuchscience
  23. somuchscience reblogged this from scinerds
  24. drooljewel reblogged this from women-in-science
  25. thescienceblog reblogged this from xanthocomically