Science Junkie

Aug 27

BGS releases Minecraft geology map 
The British Geological Survey (BGS) has turned to a novel new method for sharing information on the geology of Great Britain: Minecraft.The data, shared as a resource pack, covers mainland Britain and its smaller surrounding islands, and plonks the user down at the BGS Cardiff office as a starting location. The surface of the island is covered in Ordnance Survey mapping data, but it’s when you start digging that you discover what the BGS has brought to the table: real geology, recreated in Minecraft block types. […]"This work is an outstanding opportunity to get people using Minecraft, especially youngsters, to understand the geology beneath their feet and what it can be used for," claimed Professor John Ludden, executive director of the BGS.
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2D model  -  3D model

BGS releases Minecraft geology map

The British Geological Survey (BGS) has turned to a novel new method for sharing information on the geology of Great Britain: Minecraft.

The data, shared as a resource pack, covers mainland Britain and its smaller surrounding islands, and plonks the user down at the BGS Cardiff office as a starting location. The surface of the island is covered in Ordnance Survey mapping data, but it’s when you start digging that you discover what the BGS has brought to the table: real geology, recreated in Minecraft block types. […]

"This work is an outstanding opportunity to get people using Minecraft, especially youngsters, to understand the geology beneath their feet and what it can be used for," claimed Professor John Ludden, executive director of the BGS.

Read more

2D model  -  3D model

nemfrog:

Sugar cane. H. Zippel (botanist) & C. Bollmann (artist). 1897.

nemfrog:

Sugar cane. H. Zippel (botanist) & C. Bollmann (artist). 1897.

(via scientificillustration)

Do Antidepressants Work?
Antidepressants have been hailed as miracle drug rock stars and vilified as brain-changing happy pills.  All promotion aside—good or bad—are they effective?  The Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen digs though the data.
According to the Mayo Clinic, about 13% of Americans—more than 1 in 10—take an antidepressant. Of women between the ages of 50 and 64, nearly 1 in 4 take an antidepressant.  Second only to antibiotics, antidepressants are the most commonly prescribed class of medication.  To clarify, when I say antidepressant, I mean the most common of many classes of antidepressants—the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, like Prozac, Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil, or Zoloft.  They’re safer and cause fewer side effects than other, older types of antidepressants.So, do they work? Or do they not work?  The answer to both questions seems to be yes. I know that’s a frustrating answer.  So let’s look at each side.  We’ll start with the claim that they don’t work.
Read more

Do Antidepressants Work?

Antidepressants have been hailed as miracle drug rock stars and vilified as brain-changing happy pills.  All promotion aside—good or bad—are they effective?  The Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen digs though the data.

According to the Mayo Clinic, about 13% of Americans—more than 1 in 10—take an antidepressant. Of women between the ages of 50 and 64, nearly 1 in 4 take an antidepressant.  Second only to antibiotics, antidepressants are the most commonly prescribed class of medication. 

To clarify, when I say antidepressant, I mean the most common of many classes of antidepressants—the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, like Prozac, Celexa, Lexapro, Paxil, or Zoloft.  They’re safer and cause fewer side effects than other, older types of antidepressants.

So, do they work? Or do they not work?  The answer to both questions seems to be yes. I know that’s a frustrating answer.  So let’s look at each side.  We’ll start with the claim that they don’t work.

Read more

Aug 26

The Tinker Bell Triplet 
Credit: ESO

The Tinker Bell Triplet

Credit: ESO

mokomokuren:

PuNK

Oh,sweet, but I prefer

(via)

mokomokuren:

PuNK

Oh,sweet, but I prefer

image

(via)

(via asapscience)

Aug 25

The Origin of Humans Is Surprisingly Complicated
Human family tree used to be a scraggly thing. With relatively few fossils to work from, scientists’ best guess was that they could all be assigned to just two lineages, one of which went extinct and the other of which ultimately gave rise to us. Discoveries made over the past few decades have revealed a far more luxuriant tree, however—one abounding with branches and twigs that eventually petered out. This newfound diversity paints a much more interesting picture of our origins but makes sorting our ancestors from the evolutionary dead ends all the more challenging.
Source: Scientific American

The Origin of Humans Is Surprisingly Complicated

Human family tree used to be a scraggly thing. With relatively few fossils to work from, scientists’ best guess was that they could all be assigned to just two lineages, one of which went extinct and the other of which ultimately gave rise to us. Discoveries made over the past few decades have revealed a far more luxuriant tree, however—one abounding with branches and twigs that eventually petered out. This newfound diversity paints a much more interesting picture of our origins but makes sorting our ancestors from the evolutionary dead ends all the more challenging.

Source: Scientific American

[video]

sagansense:

I always liked Carl’s assertion that celebrating scientific discovery and delighting in the pursuit of knowledge was no where comparable to communicating opinion, but rather, “informed worship.”

sagansense:

I always liked Carl’s assertion that celebrating scientific discovery and delighting in the pursuit of knowledge was no where comparable to communicating opinion, but rather, “informed worship.”

Aug 24

[video]

libutron:

Slipper orchid - Paphiopedilum micranthum
This is a Slipper orchid of the species Paphiopedilum micranthum (Asparagales - Orchidaceae), which due to the angle of the photo resembles a strange humanoid face.
This orchid inhabits open, mossy, wet forest on highly eroded limestone mountains in China and Vietnam. Despite its remote habitat, P. micranthum has appeared in large quantities in cultivation since 1984 but is declining in the wild.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Piotr M. | Locality: cultivated (Leasingham Orchid Show, 2009)

libutron:

Slipper orchid - Paphiopedilum micranthum

This is a Slipper orchid of the species Paphiopedilum micranthum (Asparagales - Orchidaceae), which due to the angle of the photo resembles a strange humanoid face.

This orchid inhabits open, mossy, wet forest on highly eroded limestone mountains in China and Vietnam. Despite its remote habitat, P. micranthum has appeared in large quantities in cultivation since 1984 but is declining in the wild.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Piotr M. | Locality: cultivated (Leasingham Orchid Show, 2009)