Science Junkie
libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia
Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.
Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia

Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.

Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature
John Harte, a professor of ecology at the University of California, Berkeley,has developed what he calls the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) theory of ecology, which may offer a solution to a long-standing problem in ecology: how to calculate the total number of species in an ecosystem, as well as other important numbers, based on extremely limited information — which is all that ecologists, no matter how many years they spend in the field, ever have. […] He and his colleagues will soon publish the results of a study that estimates the number of insect and tree species living in a tropical forest in Panama. The paper will also suggest how MaxEnt could give species estimates in the Amazon, a swath of more than 2 million square miles of land that is notoriously difficult to survey.If the MaxEnt theory of ecology can give good estimates in a wide variety of scenarios, it could help answer the many questions that revolve around how species are spread across the landscape, such as how many would be lost if a forest were cleared, how to design wildlife preserves that keep species intact, or how many rarely seen species might be hiding in a given area. Perhaps more importantly, the theory hints at a unified way of thinking about ecology — as a system that can be described with just a few variables, with all the complexity of life built on top.
Read the article @WIRED

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature

John Harte, a professor of ecology at the University of California, Berkeley,has developed what he calls the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) theory of ecology, which may offer a solution to a long-standing problem in ecology: how to calculate the total number of species in an ecosystem, as well as other important numbers, based on extremely limited information — which is all that ecologists, no matter how many years they spend in the field, ever have. […] He and his colleagues will soon publish the results of a study that estimates the number of insect and tree species living in a tropical forest in Panama. The paper will also suggest how MaxEnt could give species estimates in the Amazon, a swath of more than 2 million square miles of land that is notoriously difficult to survey.

If the MaxEnt theory of ecology can give good estimates in a wide variety of scenarios, it could help answer the many questions that revolve around how species are spread across the landscape, such as how many would be lost if a forest were cleared, how to design wildlife preserves that keep species intact, or how many rarely seen species might be hiding in a given area. Perhaps more importantly, the theory hints at a unified way of thinking about ecology — as a system that can be described with just a few variables, with all the complexity of life built on top.

Read the article @WIRED

bbsrc:

Rounding up Rinderpest
This stunning image by Philippa Hawes, is of rinderpest virus infected cells in culture from BBSRC’s 2009 image competition. 
Described as the most dreaded of all animal diseases, rinderpest in its most virulent form could result in more than 80% mortality of cattle, buffalo, and other cloven-hoofed wildlife species.
The Pirbright Institute, formerly the Institute for Animal Health, which receives strategic funding from BBSRC, has played a significant role in eradicating the disease as the World Reference Laboratory for rinderpest. 
Enter this years #ImageswithImpact competition, open to the UK pubic, researchers and students, seeking the best pictures that represent how life sciences are changing the world, in areas like: food, farming, bioenergy, biotech, industry and health - http://bbsrc2014.picturk.com/
Copyright: Philippa Hawes
Read more on the eradication of rinderpest: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/research/impact/eradicating-rinderpest.aspx
Enter free UK competition at: http://bbsrc2014.picturk.com/

bbsrc:

Rounding up Rinderpest

This stunning image by Philippa Hawes, is of rinderpest virus infected cells in culture from BBSRC’s 2009 image competition. 

Described as the most dreaded of all animal diseases, rinderpest in its most virulent form could result in more than 80% mortality of cattle, buffalo, and other cloven-hoofed wildlife species.

The Pirbright Institute, formerly the Institute for Animal Health, which receives strategic funding from BBSRC, has played a significant role in eradicating the disease as the World Reference Laboratory for rinderpest. 

Enter this years #ImageswithImpact competition, open to the UK pubic, researchers and students, seeking the best pictures that represent how life sciences are changing the world, in areas like: food, farming, bioenergy, biotech, industry and health - http://bbsrc2014.picturk.com/

Copyright: Philippa Hawes

Read more on the eradication of rinderpest: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/research/impact/eradicating-rinderpest.aspx

Enter free UK competition at: http://bbsrc2014.picturk.com/

Hacked photosynthesis could boost crop yields
It is difficult to find fault with a process that can create food from sunlight, water and air, but for many plants, there is room for improvement. Researchers have taken an important step towards enhancing photosynthesis by engineering plants with enzymes from blue-green algae that speed up the process of converting carbon dioxide into sugars.The results, published today in Nature, surmount a daunting hurdle on the path to boosting plant yields — a goal that is taking on increasing importance as the world’s population grows.
Read more

Hacked photosynthesis could boost crop yields

It is difficult to find fault with a process that can create food from sunlight, water and air, but for many plants, there is room for improvement. Researchers have taken an important step towards enhancing photosynthesis by engineering plants with enzymes from blue-green algae that speed up the process of converting carbon dioxide into sugars.
The results, published today in Nature, surmount a daunting hurdle on the path to boosting plant yields — a goal that is taking on increasing importance as the world’s population grows.

Read more

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This infrared image shows a kilometer-high volcanic vortex swirling over the Bardarbunga eruption. The bright red at the bottom is lava escaping the fissure, whereas the yellow and white regions show rising hot gases. Although the vortex looks similar to a tornado, it is actually more like a dust devil or a so-called fire tornado. All three of these vortices are driven by a heat source near the ground that generates buoyant updrafts of air. As the hot gases rise, cooler air flows in to replace them. Any small vorticity in that ambient air gets amplified as it’s drawn to the center, the same way an ice skater spins faster when she pulls her arms in. With the right conditions, a vortex can form. Unlike a harmless dust devil, though, this vortex is likely filled with sulphur dioxide and volcanic ash and would pose a serious hazard to aviation.  (Image credit: Nicarnica Aviation; source video; via io9)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This infrared image shows a kilometer-high volcanic vortex swirling over the Bardarbunga eruption. The bright red at the bottom is lava escaping the fissure, whereas the yellow and white regions show rising hot gases. Although the vortex looks similar to a tornado, it is actually more like a dust devil or a so-called fire tornado. All three of these vortices are driven by a heat source near the ground that generates buoyant updrafts of air. As the hot gases rise, cooler air flows in to replace them. Any small vorticity in that ambient air gets amplified as it’s drawn to the center, the same way an ice skater spins faster when she pulls her arms in. With the right conditions, a vortex can form. Unlike a harmless dust devil, though, this vortex is likely filled with sulphur dioxide and volcanic ash and would pose a serious hazard to aviation.  (Image credit: Nicarnica Aviation; source video; via io9)

ibmblr:

Watson, the decision whisperer
At the rate you hear the words ‘big data’ and ‘analytics’ thrown around these days, you might think everyone was using them. And sadly you’d be wrong. In reality, most business folks leave insights out of their decisions because the tools to extract them are too complicated. Here’s a new name to drop. IBM Watson Analytics. Using natural language and a keyboard, anyone can go mining data for instant insights. Just ask your question and Watson can help guide you through answers. No fancy statistics degree required. Get the scoop →


Soon.

ibmblr:

Watson, the decision whisperer

At the rate you hear the words ‘big data’ and ‘analytics’ thrown around these days, you might think everyone was using them. And sadly you’d be wrong. In reality, most business folks leave insights out of their decisions because the tools to extract them are too complicated. Here’s a new name to drop. IBM Watson Analytics. Using natural language and a keyboard, anyone can go mining data for instant insights. Just ask your question and Watson can help guide you through answers. No fancy statistics degree required. Get the scoop 

image

Soon.

bbsrc:

Scientists visualise the scars left by heart attacks 
These images show (A) a healthy heart and (B) a heart damaged due to a lack of oxygen during a heart attack.
As you can see, the microstructure of a heart changes after a heart attack (B). The scar (outlined area), is formed because of the tissue death caused by a local lack of oxygen, and the consistency of muscle cell arrangement compared to the healthy heart (A) is lost. This will affect how much blood the heart can pump into the body within one heartbeat.
The images taken by BBSRC-funded researchers at the British Heart Foundation Experimental Magnetic Resonance Unit (BMRU), University of Oxford, were generated by a special type of imaging technique that measures the motion and movement of water molecules in the heart tissue.
This new technology, that Dr Jurgen Schneider and his team have developed, could eventually allow doctors to be able to look at a 3D+T representation of the patient’s heart, zoom-in on any relevant detail (a coronary vessel blockage or a damaged part of tissue), assess treatment options, and predict outcomes for the specific individual before the patient even enters the operating theatre. Much of this vision is still far ahead. Nonetheless, this research is vital to its development.
Image credit: BHF Experimental MR Unit, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford.
Read more: http://www.rdm.ox.ac.uk/principal-investigators/researcher/jurgen-schneider
Read more on how BBSRC-funded scientists are trying to mend broken hearts: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2014/140214-n-helping-mend-broken-hearts.aspx
Zoom Info
bbsrc:

Scientists visualise the scars left by heart attacks 
These images show (A) a healthy heart and (B) a heart damaged due to a lack of oxygen during a heart attack.
As you can see, the microstructure of a heart changes after a heart attack (B). The scar (outlined area), is formed because of the tissue death caused by a local lack of oxygen, and the consistency of muscle cell arrangement compared to the healthy heart (A) is lost. This will affect how much blood the heart can pump into the body within one heartbeat.
The images taken by BBSRC-funded researchers at the British Heart Foundation Experimental Magnetic Resonance Unit (BMRU), University of Oxford, were generated by a special type of imaging technique that measures the motion and movement of water molecules in the heart tissue.
This new technology, that Dr Jurgen Schneider and his team have developed, could eventually allow doctors to be able to look at a 3D+T representation of the patient’s heart, zoom-in on any relevant detail (a coronary vessel blockage or a damaged part of tissue), assess treatment options, and predict outcomes for the specific individual before the patient even enters the operating theatre. Much of this vision is still far ahead. Nonetheless, this research is vital to its development.
Image credit: BHF Experimental MR Unit, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford.
Read more: http://www.rdm.ox.ac.uk/principal-investigators/researcher/jurgen-schneider
Read more on how BBSRC-funded scientists are trying to mend broken hearts: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2014/140214-n-helping-mend-broken-hearts.aspx
Zoom Info

bbsrc:

Scientists visualise the scars left by heart attacks

These images show (A) a healthy heart and (B) a heart damaged due to a lack of oxygen during a heart attack.

As you can see, the microstructure of a heart changes after a heart attack (B). The scar (outlined area), is formed because of the tissue death caused by a local lack of oxygen, and the consistency of muscle cell arrangement compared to the healthy heart (A) is lost. This will affect how much blood the heart can pump into the body within one heartbeat.

The images taken by BBSRC-funded researchers at the British Heart Foundation Experimental Magnetic Resonance Unit (BMRU), University of Oxford, were generated by a special type of imaging technique that measures the motion and movement of water molecules in the heart tissue.

This new technology, that Dr Jurgen Schneider and his team have developed, could eventually allow doctors to be able to look at a 3D+T representation of the patient’s heart, zoom-in on any relevant detail (a coronary vessel blockage or a damaged part of tissue), assess treatment options, and predict outcomes for the specific individual before the patient even enters the operating theatre. Much of this vision is still far ahead. Nonetheless, this research is vital to its development.

Image credit: BHF Experimental MR Unit, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Oxford.

Read more: http://www.rdm.ox.ac.uk/principal-investigators/researcher/jurgen-schneider

Read more on how BBSRC-funded scientists are trying to mend broken hearts: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2014/140214-n-helping-mend-broken-hearts.aspx