Science Junkie
Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface

“The Hills of Tuscany” or “Landscape with River” (sometimes identified as the Arno), da Vinci’s oldest known work (dated to 1473) is considered one of the first realistic landscape-views. Leonardo used oblique construction lines and two vanishing points at the horizon (note the fields on the right corner) to achieve a geometric perspective.
Also the layers of the earth, shown above the waterfall (center of an image), are not only geologically correct (thin at the bottom and thick on the top, like the Turbidite sequences found in the Apennines) but work also as horizontal construction lines.

Valdarno: “my” land, “my” geology. 

Leonardo da Vinci and the Realistic Depiction of the Earth’s Surface

“The Hills of Tuscany” or “Landscape with River” (sometimes identified as the Arno), da Vinci’s oldest known work (dated to 1473) is considered one of the first realistic landscape-views. Leonardo used oblique construction lines and two vanishing points at the horizon (note the fields on the right corner) to achieve a geometric perspective.

Also the layers of the earth, shown above the waterfall (center of an image), are not only geologically correct (thin at the bottom and thick on the top, like the Turbidite sequences found in the Apennines) but work also as horizontal construction lines.

Valdarno: “my” land, “my” geology. 

theatlantic:

CAPTCHAs Are Becoming Security Theater

CAPTCHAs are a time-worn way for humans to tell computers that we are human. They are those little boxes filled with distorted text that we’ve been told humans can decipher, but computers—the bad guys’ computers—cannot. So, Watson-be-damned, we enter the letters and gain access to whatever is behind the veil, leaving the bad bots steaming outside the pearly, CAPTCHA’d gates. As Google’s ReCAPTCHA website puts it: “Tough on bots, easy on humans.”
It is a satisfying display of human superiority built into the daily experience of the web. And, BONUS, you’re often helping do optical character recognition on old books at the same time. Take that, Machines, you don’t even have any books.
But then along comes Google today noting, in a showily short and breezy blog post, that their machines can beat ReCAPTCHAs 99% of the time.
Read more.


Of course, otherwise it would be hard to explain this. If it was really a war, humans would be outnumbered, hands down.

theatlantic:

CAPTCHAs Are Becoming Security Theater

CAPTCHAs are a time-worn way for humans to tell computers that we are human. They are those little boxes filled with distorted text that we’ve been told humans can decipher, but computers—the bad guys’ computers—cannot. So, Watson-be-damned, we enter the letters and gain access to whatever is behind the veil, leaving the bad bots steaming outside the pearly, CAPTCHA’d gates. As Google’s ReCAPTCHA website puts it: “Tough on bots, easy on humans.”

It is a satisfying display of human superiority built into the daily experience of the web. And, BONUS, you’re often helping do optical character recognition on old books at the same time. Take that, Machines, you don’t even have any books.

But then along comes Google today noting, in a showily short and breezy blog post, that their machines can beat ReCAPTCHAs 99% of the time.

Read more.

Of course, otherwise it would be hard to explain this. If it was really a war, humans would be outnumbered, hands down.

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
Zoom Info
skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.
I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):
Madagascar diadem Hypolimnas dexithea (photo by Michel-Georges Bernard)
Comet moth Argema mittrei (photo by Axel Strauß)
Sunset moth Chrysiridia rhipheus (photo from Wikimedia Commons) 
Giant Blue Morpho Morpho didius (photo by Didier Descouens, Muséum de Toulouse)
Rippon’s Birdwing Troides hypolitus (photo by Robert Nash, Ulster Museum)
*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.
The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:
Zoom Info

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info
neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain
For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.
By Voxy.
Zoom Info

neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

libutron:

Sylvain azuré (Azuritis reducta) Southern White Admiral | ©Anne Sorbes (Vercors, France)
Azuritis reducta (Nymphalidae) is found in Southern Europe where it is widespread.
The brown upper of this butterfly shows blue sheen, according to the light. The wingspan is about 45 to 53 mm. It is visible in dry areas with rocks and grasses, in wet clearings and forest. Its preferred foodplant is the Honeysuckle.

libutron:

Sylvain azuré (Azuritis reducta) Southern White Admiral | ©Anne Sorbes (Vercors, France)

Azuritis reducta (Nymphalidae) is found in Southern Europe where it is widespread.

The brown upper of this butterfly shows blue sheen, according to the light. The wingspan is about 45 to 53 mm. It is visible in dry areas with rocks and grasses, in wet clearings and forest. Its preferred foodplant is the Honeysuckle.

futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info
futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.
humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.
Zoom Info

futurist-foresight:

Looking back at Apollo 16.

humanoidhistory:

On April 16, 1972, the Apollo 16 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral on a journey to the Moon. Astronauts John Young, Charlie Duke, and Ken Mattingly went on the penultimate adventure of the Apollo program with a mission that lasted 11 days, 1 hour, and 51 minutes, ending at 2:45 PM EST on April 27.

(Source: youtube.com)